Answer to Q #14

The story about the demise of a wolf hunter in the Pyrenees (South of France) appeared in a French newspaper.

Seton pounced on the idea for his next work. The painting caused controversy not only because of the content, but also Seton’s chosen title “Triumph of the Wolves”. He was convinced to change the title to “Awaited in Vain”.
The 121.92 cm by 213.36 cm (4 ft by 7 ft) painting hangs at the National Scouting Museum on Philmont Scout Ranch near Cimarron, New Mexico.

Answer to Q #6

Q #6: What was Black Wolf’s given name?

A: Ernest Evan Thompson. His middle name was conferred upon him in honor of Evan Cameron of Lochiel, an ancestor who was known as the greatest wolf hunter of his time, credited with hunting the last wolf in Scotland. More about the Seton ancestry can be found in Trail of an Artist-Naturalist: the autobiography of Ernest Thompson Seton.

 

Answer to Q #4

Q #4: Name the valley that was terrorized by wolves and became the backdrop for the story of Lobo.

Currumpaw or Corrumpa. According to New Mexico Place Names, A Geographical Dictionary (1965), the word is an Indian term meaning “wild or isolated”. Corrompa is another alternate spelling meaning “corrupt” in Latin.

A personal thought: I image that when Seton was giving a title to his most famous story, he capitalized on the “paw” in Currumpaw, emphasizing the association with animals, particularly canines –wolves and coyotes.