ET Seton Institute

Check Out Ned Gannon’s Blog – The King of Currumpaw

One of the things I enjoy is scouring the internet for things related to Ernest Thompson Seton to share on this site. Today, I have found a gem. I am sharing a link to a blog entitled King of Currumpaw, which is a blog maintained by Ned Gannon.

Here are the first words of the “About” page on the blog:
“In his tale, Lobo, Ernest Thompson Seton wrote about a wolf that evaded his attempts to capture it in New Mexico for months, earning the wolf the title of King of the Currumpaw. Nature created a program about this incident called The Wolf That Changed America. My grandfather knew Seton who later became an advocate for nature’s preservation and the presence of wolves in America’s ecosystems.

Entries on this blog seek to explore art, nature, literature, philosophy, and the ecology of wolves, because I believe education is a key element in preventing the degradation and destruction of human culture and the natural world…”

Here is a link to a post on the blog in which Ned comments on Lobo, The King of Currumpaw and The Wolf That Changed America and how he  found out that his grandfather had hiked and boated with Seton.  The post includes a family  photo of his grandfather with Seton n the field.

Ned Gannon is a painter, illustrator, and writer.   He attended the Kansas City Art Institute and the School of Visual Arts in New York where he received his M.F.A. He lived and worked on the North Shore of Staten Island in New York City for seven years before moving to Wisconsin. He currently teaches at the University of Wisconsin in Eau Claire, where he works and exhibits.

You can find out more about Ned and see his work at his website:  www.nedgannon.com.

One thought on “Check Out Ned Gannon’s Blog – The King of Currumpaw

  1. Ned

    Thanks so much for sharing. I was an adult before I really began to explore and appreciate this part of my dad’s family history even though I’ve always held an interest in wolves, but better late than never… Love to see these stories and pictures passed on to other “wayfarers”.

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