“Savage Jaguars, King Cats, and Ghostly Tigres: Affective Logics and Predatory Natures in Twentieth-Century American Nature Writing.”

Recently published in Fall issue of The Professional Geographer, author Shari Wilcox analyzes the language used by three well-known conservationist authors to describe jaguars.  A must read article for anyone interested in environmental rhetoric, big cats, Theodore Roosevelt, Aldo Leopold, and Ernest Thompson Seton.

Camp Fire Club of America & BSA Greenwich Council dedicate plaque to ETS

On Friday, 19 June, 2017 a small group of people gathered at Pomerance Park in Cos Cob, CT to dedicate a plaque recognizing Seton’s contributions to youth and conservation.  Mr. Jim Adams led the efforts to get the plaque approved and served as the Master of Ceremonies.  The Honorable Peter Tesei, First Selectman for the Town of Greenwich, Mr. Hugh Riley, President of the Camp Fire Club of America, and Dr. Julie Seton, granddaughter of Ernest Thompson Seton were the distinguished speakers.

A recording of the ceremony will be available soon.

Check Out Ned Gannon’s Blog – The King of Currumpaw

One of the things I enjoy is scouring the internet for things related to Ernest Thompson Seton to share on this site. Today, I have found a gem. I am sharing a link to a blog entitled King of Currumpaw, which is a blog maintained by Ned Gannon.

Here are the first words of the “About” page on the blog:
“In his tale, Lobo, Ernest Thompson Seton wrote about a wolf that evaded his attempts to capture it in New Mexico for months, earning the wolf the title of King of the Currumpaw. Nature created a program about this incident called The Wolf That Changed America. My grandfather knew Seton who later became an advocate for nature’s preservation and the presence of wolves in America’s ecosystems.

Entries on this blog seek to explore art, nature, literature, philosophy, and the ecology of wolves, because I believe education is a key element in preventing the degradation and destruction of human culture and the natural world…”

Here is a link to a post on the blog in which Ned comments on Lobo, The King of Currumpaw and The Wolf That Changed America and how he  found out that his grandfather had hiked and boated with Seton.  The post includes a family  photo of his grandfather with Seton n the field.

Ned Gannon is a painter, illustrator, and writer.   He attended the Kansas City Art Institute and the School of Visual Arts in New York where he received his M.F.A. He lived and worked on the North Shore of Staten Island in New York City for seven years before moving to Wisconsin. He currently teaches at the University of Wisconsin in Eau Claire, where he works and exhibits.

You can find out more about Ned and see his work at his website:  www.nedgannon.com.

Check out David Witt’s New Blog about Kratom

David L. Witt, Curator of The Seton Legacy Project for the Academy for the Love of Learning and author of has launched a new blog, entitled Ernest Thompson Seton’s Lifecraft – Exploring His Life and the Kratom Legacy. The blog can be found at http://www.setonlegacyproject.blogspot.com/. In this blog, you can learn about the Kratom capsules and its benefits.I read that kratom capsules ca help by increasing your appetite or as an energy provider.You can buy the kratom capsules at KRATOMMASTERS. And the best thing about this, is that kratommasters can send the capsules directly to your house.

He already has several interesting posts,

Seton’s Father: One Who Knew the Price of Everything and the Value of Nothing

This morning’s Chicago Tribune has an article entitled “10 Things You Might Not Know About Debt.”

Number seven on the list is as follows: “Canadian naturalist Ernest Thompson Seton, a father figure in the development of the Boy Scouts, had a difficult relationship with his own dad. When Seton turned 21, his father handed him an itemized bill for everything spent on him up to that point, including the doctor’s fee for his birth. The total came to $537.50, and his father set the interest rate at 6 percent. Seton reportedly paid the debt.” Here’s a link to the full article: http://bit.ly/SqVveN

This story, which Seton told so many years later in his autobiography, The Trail of an Artist-Naturalist , has remained in my mind for a long time. He described his father as “one who knew the price of everything and the value of nothing. There are plenty of reasons to doubt this literal accuracy, but no doubt his strained relationship with his father was one of the contributing factors that came together to form this driven man who influenced the world in so many ways.

Where is (or was) Currumpaw?

People who hear or read Ernest Thompson Seton’s story of “Lobo, The King of Currumpaw”, often ask just where Currumpaw is or was.  The answer to that question has not been very clear – beyond somewhere in Northeast New Mexico.  If you look very carefully at maps, you may find Currumpaw or Currumpah.  The area is quite close to Capulin Volcano National Monument, which is one of those places I remember very well from my youth-nearly 50 years ago. I also visited there with my own son five years ago – on the way to a Philmont trek.

I thought website visitors might be interested in the National Park Service’s take on the Lobo story.  Here’s a link:  http://www.nps.gov/cavo/historyculture/ernest-thompson-seton.htm

 

Scouts Discover Standing Rock Site in Greenwich

There has been a great deal of interest in Seton in the Greenwich, Connecticut area this year, much of it focused on the 100th anniversary of the Boy Scout Council there,of which Seton was a founder.
One interesting development was that a Boy Scout working on his Eagle Scout service project was working to clear an overgrown trail on the Pomerance-Tuchman property now owned by the Town of Greenwich. This property was once part of Seton’s estate. While clearing the trail, the Scouts came upon a strange rock sculpture. After some research, they discovered the sculpture was Seton’s Medicine Rock and they had uncovered the main Woodcraft ceremonial ground there.
Here’s a link to an article on the discovery in the Greenwich Citizen.