Julie Seton to Speak in Greenwich

Julie SetonJulie Seton, Ernest Thompson Seton’s granddaughter, will be speaking at an event on Sunday, June 11 at the Ernest Thompson Seton Scout Reservation in Greenwich, Connecticut.  The event is cosponsored by the Greenwich Historical Society and the Greenwich Council of the Boy Scouts of America.  This talk by Julie Seton will touch on the highlights of his life with special attention to how his Greenwich, CT estate, called Wyndygoul, was instrumental in shaping the programs of the Boy Scouts, Camp Fire Girls, Woodcraft League  and other organizations.

Julie has recently been traveling extensively across the country giving talks about Seton and conducting research.  If you have the chance, don’t miss one of her presentations.

Sunday, June 11, 2017
Tours and Reception 3:00 to 4:00 pm
Program begins at 4:15 pm

363 Riversville Road, Greenwich. Parking is limited; carpooling suggested.

Admission is free but reservations are required.
RSVP to shealy@greenwichhistory.org or call 203-869-6899, Ext. 10.

The Storyteller: My Years with Ernest Thompson Seton

Storyteller ImageThe Storyteller, My Years with Ernest Thompson Seton, by Leila Moss Knox with Linda L. Knox,, is a delightful, engaging book that documents the  three year period that the author, Leila Moss Knox lived with her aunt Julia Moss Seton and her husband Ernest Thompson Seton, who she called “Granddaddy”.  It is a remarkable story of their adventures intertwined with photos and excerpts of Seton’s writings.  While it is packaged as a children’s book, it is equally appropriate for adults as well. As an added treat, it contains an introduction by Pete Seeger, who died before the book was published.  Seeger often told stories of reading Seton books as a child.

When I started reading The Storyteller, I couldn’t put it down.  There have been several very good biographies of Seton, but none have captured the unique character of the man any better.  When you add the reminiscences of the sites and sounds of 1930s New Mexico, the result is a fascinating story – vivid and easy to read.  I highly recommend this book to anyone – young or old -who is interested in experiencing a previously uncaptured side of Ernest Thompson Seton.

 

Highly recommended.  Click here to order it from Amazon.

Check Out Ned Gannon’s Blog – The King of Currumpaw

One of the things I enjoy is scouring the internet for things related to Ernest Thompson Seton to share on this site. Today, I have found a gem. I am sharing a link to a blog entitled King of Currumpaw, which is a blog maintained by Ned Gannon.

Here are the first words of the “About” page on the blog:
“In his tale, Lobo, Ernest Thompson Seton wrote about a wolf that evaded his attempts to capture it in New Mexico for months, earning the wolf the title of King of the Currumpaw. Nature created a program about this incident called The Wolf That Changed America. My grandfather knew Seton who later became an advocate for nature’s preservation and the presence of wolves in America’s ecosystems.

Entries on this blog seek to explore art, nature, literature, philosophy, and the ecology of wolves, because I believe education is a key element in preventing the degradation and destruction of human culture and the natural world…”

Here is a link to a post on the blog in which Ned comments on Lobo, The King of Currumpaw and The Wolf That Changed America and how he  found out that his grandfather had hiked and boated with Seton.  The post includes a family  photo of his grandfather with Seton n the field.

Ned Gannon is a painter, illustrator, and writer.   He attended the Kansas City Art Institute and the School of Visual Arts in New York where he received his M.F.A. He lived and worked on the North Shore of Staten Island in New York City for seven years before moving to Wisconsin. He currently teaches at the University of Wisconsin in Eau Claire, where he works and exhibits.

You can find out more about Ned and see his work at his website:  www.nedgannon.com.

Greenwich Scouts hold Camporee, Service Project at Seton’s Wyndygoul

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of scouting in Greenwich, Boy Scouts recently held their 2012 Fall Camporee and completed a service project at the Pomerance Property, the site of Ernest Thompson Seton’s Wyndygoul Estate. tErnest Thompson Seton founded the Greenwich Council.

There were 115 Scouts and volunteers on site to help clear four trails in the Pomerance Property and Montgomery Pinetum, marking this as the 100th service project over the last two years. It also marked the successful completion of the Greenwich Scouting “Good Turn for Greenwich” service initiative.

Here’s a link to a story about the event.

The Seton Journals: A rare look at the writings and drawings of an artist/illustrator/naturalist

The Greenwich Citizen in Greenwich, Connecticut has an interesting article on Seton’s Journals entitled The Seton Journals: A rare look at the writings and drawings of an artist/illustrator/naturalist
Here’s a link to the story and photos: http://www.greenwichcitizen.com/news/article/The-Seton-Journals-A-rare-look-at-the-writings-4147276.php

Seton’s Father: One Who Knew the Price of Everything and the Value of Nothing

This morning’s Chicago Tribune has an article entitled “10 Things You Might Not Know About Debt.”

Number seven on the list is as follows: “Canadian naturalist Ernest Thompson Seton, a father figure in the development of the Boy Scouts, had a difficult relationship with his own dad. When Seton turned 21, his father handed him an itemized bill for everything spent on him up to that point, including the doctor’s fee for his birth. The total came to $537.50, and his father set the interest rate at 6 percent. Seton reportedly paid the debt.” Here’s a link to the full article: http://bit.ly/SqVveN

This story, which Seton told so many years later in his autobiography, The Trail of an Artist-Naturalist , has remained in my mind for a long time. He described his father as “one who knew the price of everything and the value of nothing. There are plenty of reasons to doubt this literal accuracy, but no doubt his strained relationship with his father was one of the contributing factors that came together to form this driven man who influenced the world in so many ways.

Where is (or was) Currumpaw?

People who hear or read Ernest Thompson Seton’s story of “Lobo, The King of Currumpaw”, often ask just where Currumpaw is or was.  The answer to that question has not been very clear – beyond somewhere in Northeast New Mexico.  If you look very carefully at maps, you may find Currumpaw or Currumpah.  The area is quite close to Capulin Volcano National Monument, which is one of those places I remember very well from my youth-nearly 50 years ago. I also visited there with my own son five years ago – on the way to a Philmont trek.

I thought website visitors might be interested in the National Park Service’s take on the Lobo story.  Here’s a link:  http://www.nps.gov/cavo/historyculture/ernest-thompson-seton.htm

 

The Biography of a Grizzly on a Great List of “Great Books and Where to Read Them”

Smithsonian.com’s blog Off The Road – Travel Adventures of a Nomad on the Cheap recently had an interesting post entitled “Great Books and Where to Read Them.”  One of the books listed was Ernest Thompson Seton’s Biography of a Grizzly, which the author, Alastair Bland,  suggests should be read in the Grand Tetons and Yellowstone National Park.  Seton is in good company in this article, which includes a variety of other authors, books and suggested locations.  Highly recommended.